Class Filled: Hour Accelerated Radiation Safety Officer Course
Wednesday October 9, 2019


Class Filled: 40 hour Radiation Safety Officer Certification Course
September 30-October 4, 2019

 

Chernobyl vodka: Scientists create booze from disaster's exclusion zone

High radiation levels found in giant clams of Marshall Islands near U.S. nuclear dump

Troubled SC nuclear firm Kept radioactive trash in leaky bin

Fowler Associates Labs

Fowler Associates
is Now offering Online
Consultations & Training

IRRSO

International registry of Radiation Safety Officers

IRRSO - is now listed on the
International Atomic
Energy Agency's
Nuclear Handbook

South Carolina Offers
Free Radon
Kits to Residents

Lean Manufacturing
Class

 

Radiation
Safety

Operations
-- RSO

 

Fukushima disaster: first residents return to town next to nuclear plant

Decades after nuclear disaster, tourism is booming in Chernobyl

Former USA Hockey Star Says Radon Gas Caused Her Stage 4 Lung Cancer

Was British scientist who first linked Russia to Litvinenko’s assassination another victim of Kremlin killers?

A spa where patients bathe in radioactive water

Radium contamination in water most widespread in Texas, environmental group says

X-Rays Made with Scotch Tape: Unwinding Scotch tape produces enough radiation to image a human finger. A View from Katherine Bourzac

Particle Accelerator Reveals Secrets of Ancient Mummy

Treatment of Cancer and Inflammation With Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation

South Korea detects radioactive gas from North Korea bomb test

New hostel opens in the most radioactive place on the planet

Mysterious 'Star Wars blaster fire' sound is heard coming from the Northern Lights and travelling through power lines

Reindeer Are Still Very Radioactive 30 Years After Chernobyl

Norway Nuclear Reactor Leaks Radioactive Iodine: Officials

TVA’s Watts Bar Unit 2 achieves commercial operation

“Command and Control”: The day Arkansas was almost nuked

Nuclear accident in New Mexico ranks among the costliest in U.S. history

It's hot: Chernobyl now a tourist zone

Brussels suspects linked to nuclear facility plot

Leaking Beachfront Nuclear Reactor Near Miami Threatening Florida Everglades

 

 

 

Federal health officials agree radioactive waste in St. Louis area may be linked to cancer

A Decision of Epic Proportions: The Atomic Bomb

Man accused of trying to hire hit man, buy lethal radioactive material

Storage capacity for radioactive water at Fukushima power plant nears limit

Leo Szilard's Fight to Stop the Bomb

Turning DOWN radiation levels during normal radiotherapy treatment sparks a 'seek and destroy' mission by body's immune system to target cancer cells

The History Hour: The Posioning of Litvinenko

Three Mile Island nuclear plant will close in 2 years, owner says

December 2017 Food Irradiation Update

Tunnel collapse at Hanford Nuclear site, emergency declared

Judge: Feds must move plutonium from Savannah River Site

Weapons Physicist Declassifies Rescued Nuclear Test Films

FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE? Dangerous radioactive particles have been detected across Europe and no-one knows where they came from

Restored Hawker Hurricane to Take to the Skies Again

Reactor shut down after nuclear plant explosion

Incredibly high radiation levels discovered at crippled Fukushima plant

The Pope of Physics: Enrico Fermi and the Birth of the Atomic Age

Welcome to 'the Most Toxic Place in America'

This fall, the “Radioactive Boy Scout” died at age 39

October 2016 Food Irradiation Update

Nuclear gauge reported stolen in West Virginia

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rad Journal & radjournal.com are Trademarks of Fowler Associates, Inc. - All Rights Reserved The content & Look of the Rad Journal & radjournal.com are Copyrighted by Fowler Associates, Inc. - All Rights Reserved

The YouTube name and logo are copyright of YouTube, LLC.

Fukushima Crisis Updates

Today In Radiation Safety History



On October 21, 2018 Joachim Rønneberg passed away from natural causes at the age of 99.
From the New York Times:

The Norwegian saboteurs skied across the Telemark pine forest in winter whites, phantom apparitions gliding over moonlit snow. They halted at a steep river gorge and gazed down at a humming hydroelectric power plant where Nazi scientists had developed a mysterious, top-secret project.

Lt. Joachim Ronneberg, the 23-year-old resistance fighter in command, and his eight comrades ­ all carrying cyanide capsules to swallow if captured ­ had been told by British intelligence only that the plant was distilling something called heavy water, and that it was vital to Hitler’s war effort.

Hours later, in one of the most celebrated commando raids of World War II, Lieutenant Ronneberg and his demolition team sneaked past guards and a barracks full of German troops, stole into the plant, set explosive charges and blew up Hitler’s hopes for a critical ingredient to create the first atomic bomb.

Mr. Ronneberg, the last surviving member of the 1943 raid and one of the most decorated war heroes of a nation renowned for valorous resistance to the 1940-45 German Occupation, died on Sunday in Alesund, Norway, his daughter, Birte Ronneberg, said. He was 99.

Mr. Ronneberg and his saboteurs were showered with international honors after the war for what they had regarded as a suicide mission. It was celebrated in books, documentaries and films, notably Anthony Mann’s 1965 production, “The Heroes of Telemark,” starring Kirk Douglas, in what critics called a fact-flawed version of what had happened.

It was not until the war’s end in 1945 that Mr. Ronneberg learned the significance of the raid. “The first time I heard about atomic bombs and heavy water was after Americans dropped the bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki,” he told The New York Times in 2015. Had the raid failed, he concluded, London would have ended up “looking like Hiroshima.”

Historians have long debated how close Hitler came to nuclear weapons. A German writer, Rainer Karlsch, claimed in “Hitler’s Bomb” (2005), that German physicists conducted three nuclear tests in 1944 and 1945. But he gave no proof. A more widely accepted view is that Hitler’s program, which predated the Manhattan Project, faltered in midwar because of scientific errors and Norway’s successful saboteurs.

By 1942, the British knew that Germany had chosen heavy water, or deuterium oxide, to moderate atom-splitting chain reactions to produce bomb-grade plutonium. They knew further that the Norsk Hydro plant in Norway, which had been extracting heavy water since 1934 for making fertilizer, had been taken over by Nazi invaders as the world’s best source of the isotope for Berlin’s atomic weapons program.

A 35-man British commando team had been lost on a 1942 mission to sabotage the plant. Britain then enlisted the Norwegian volunteers under Mr. Ronneberg for Operation Gunnerside, endorsed by Prime Minister Winston Churchill. Air attacks were not ordered for fear of heavy casualties to Norwegian workers and a low probability of success because the heavy water had been distilled in a basement fortified against bombs.

After training in Britain, the group parachuted into Norway. A four-member advance team with a radio and supplies went first, in October 1942. Six others followed in February. They rendezvoused at a cabin 40 miles from the target, at Vemork, on the forested plateau called the Hardangervidda, a national park today.

Blizzards stalled them for a week. Finally, they moved out. One man was designated to break off from the team to maintain radio contact with London. Nine others set off with rations for five days, explosives, fuses, Tommy guns, grenades, compasses and a pair of metal shears that Mr. Ronneberg had picked up at a London hardware store. That final item would prove critical.

They skied by night, rested by day and reached the gorge late on the night of Feb. 27, 1943. Steep slopes plunged 1,000 feet to the Mana River. The power plant was perched on a ledge halfway up the far slope. A guarded suspension bridge over the river led to the front entrance. At the back was a railway line and the German troops’ barracks. Guards patrolled the tracks and a wire fence around the back entrance.

There was no easy way in. “There were so many things that were just luck and chance,” Mr. Ronneberg told The Times. “There was no plan. We were just hoping for the best.” They decided to try the back way.

They waited for hours after midnight, watching the changes of night-shift workers and guards. Then, 75 yards upstream, they climbed down into the windswept gorge, clinging to shrubs and branches to break falls. They crossed the river on an ice bridge, then slogged up the far slope, waist-deep in snowdrifts. They saw guards on the suspension bridge, but the rushing river and the plant’s hum masked their own noises.

Creeping down the railway tracks unseen, they hid behind storage sheds near the perimeter fence. Five remained concealed there, ready to fire on the barracks or the guards, but they were not seen. When a sentry left the fence to make rounds, Mr. Ronneberg and three others dashed to the gate, cut a padlock with the shears and darted into the compound.

They split into two teams. All doors were locked, but Mr. Ronneberg and Fredrik Kayser found a small duct for cables and pipes. Mr. Ronneberg and Mr. Kayser squeezed in, dragging rucksacks of explosives behind them. The duct led to a cavernous hall.

They recognized it as the heavy-water production center: a latticework of iron pipes, rubber tubes, electrical wires and 18 stainless steel cylinders, each 50 inches tall and 10 inches in diameter ­ the heavy-water containers. There was no guard, only a workman at a desk. They dropped down, and Mr. Kayser put a gun to the man’s chest, urging him to be silent.

Mr. Ronneberg unpacked the rucksacks and began attaching explosives to the storage cylinders and water-distillation apparatus. They were joined by the other two demolition men, who had broken a window to get in. They set fuses on 30-second timers, ignited them with matches and fled.

As they raced past the barracks, they heard the muffled crump of the explosion. Soon sirens began to wail at the plant. But the saboteurs were out of sight by the time Germans scrambled from the barracks and workers scattered in chaos. A hunt by 2,800 soldiers spread over the countryside. But by sunrise, the saboteurs were well away, beginning a 280-mile trek across forests and mountains to neutral Sweden.

The raid ­ with no shots fired and no saboteurs wounded ­ had destroyed the cylinders, sending 1,100 pounds of heavy water down a drain, along with the plant’s capacity to make more. It took the Germans four months to rebuild, and more time to restore full production. But in November, the Vemork operation was crippled again by Allied bombers.

Hitler ordered the project moved to Germany, but a Norwegian ferry carrying the equipment and the remaining stocks of heavy water was sunk on route by resistance saboteurs in early 1944. That ended Nazi Germany’s struggle for Norwegian heavy water and all of the regime’s realistic hopes for an atomic bomb.